Learn more about pollen - Ash trees

Ash (Species, Fraxinus sp.; Family, Oleaceae)

Ash, a wind-pollinated tree belonging to the family Oleaceae, is distributed world-wide and has been suggested as a potent allergen source in spring time. In the Canberra region Ash trees are widely planted in gardens and parklands due to their deciduous habit and the striking display of colour during the autumn months. The peak pollen season for Fraxinus sp. is from August to September.

Ash and olive trees belong to the same family (Oleaceae) and it has been shown that people who are allergic to Ash tree pollen are also likely to be allergic to Olive tree pollen.

Distribution of Ash trees (Fraxinus sp.) from Atlas of Living Australia occurence maps

 

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Learn more about pollen - Cypress Pine

Cypress Pine (Species, Cupressus sp. and Callitris sp.; Family, Cupressaceae)

Densely branched tree or shrub with male and female cones. There are over 20 species of the introduced Cypress (Cupressus sp.) planted in and around Canberra. The native Cypress pine (Callitris sp.) is also found in gardens and in fire protected areas such as the Molongolo Gorge. They are wind-pollinated and produce copious amounts of pollen during July to December.

White Cypress (Murray) Pine (Callitris glaucophylla) is one of the few Australian trees that produces highly allergenic pollen. Its growth extends from the western slopes and plains of Eastern Australia, but it can be found planted in and around Canberra.

The pollen from introduced Cupressus sp. has been widely reported to cause winter conjunctivitis, rhinitis, and asthma in various parts of the world and is becoming a major health problem in some northern hemisphere Mediterranean countries.

Distribution of Cupressaceae (left: Callitris glaucophylla; right: Cupressaceae) from Atlas of Living Australia occurence maps

      

 

 

 

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Learn more about pollen - Pine trees

Pine (Species, Pinus sp.; Family, Pinaceae)

There are a diverse range of Pine trees planted in and around Canberra with over 20 species found in gardens and more extensiveparklands and plantations. They are wind-pollinated and produce copious amounts of pollen during August to November when "dust clouds" of pollen can be seen blowing from the trees or settling in ponds and pools leaving a distinctive yellow "smear" on the surface. 

The pollen grains are large with a wing structure that facilitates long-distance dispersal on windy days. Pine pollen allergies are similar to other pollen allergies, and many people with pine pollen allergy are also allergic to grass pollen.

Distribution of Pinus sp. (Atlas of Living Australia occurence map)

 

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